This category refers to the best designed modern railway project. The project must offer state of the art public transport, excellent commuter experience and passenger/cargo flows, optimum community integration, multiple employment opportunities and enhanced connections and linkages between urban and remote centres to boost the country’s GDP.

 

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This category refers to the best designed modern railway project. The project must offer state of the art public transport, excellent commuter experience and passenger/cargo flows, optimum community integration, multiple employment opportunities and enhanced connections and linkages between urban and remote centres to boost the country’s GDP.

 

"> Best Railway Design Project 2016

Best Railway Design Project 2016

PE News
Fri, 17-Jun-2016, 09:29
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Uganda China Harbour Engineering Company Limited (CHEC).

Uganda is in the plans of constructing a US$ 3.2bn railway line that will join Kampala through Malaba to Nimule in South Sudan. This will be in part of the Standard Gauge Railway construction project already underway to connect East African countries.

 

The railway project in Uganda has received a major boost following the signing of Engineering Procurement Construction (EPC) agreement last week by Uganda’s president-Yoweri Museveni and China Harbour Engineering Company Limited (CHEC).  The signing took place in State Auditorium in Beijing, China. China has approved to finance the 476 km line, which include catering for the detailed designs of the railway.

 

Mr. Museveni said that once the railway line is complete, most of the transportation problems will be solved as Uganda’s heavy cargoes from the ports is usually transported via road, which brings about several challenges. The cargoes from the ports will be transported at a faster and cheaper rate, he further said.

 

The Standard Gauge Railway construction project was agreed on by four countries; Kenya, Uganda, Rwanda and South Sudan and it will be a vital infrastructure project for the Northern Corridor. Standard Gauge Railway was launched on October last year when Uganda President, President of Rwanda, Mr. Paul Kagame, South Sudan President Mr. Salva Kiir and representatives from Kenya and Burundi met in Uganda.

 

Construction has already started in Mombasa, Kenya and once complete, the new line will connect Mombasa to Malaba, then onward to Kampala in Uganda, then Kigali (with a branch line to Kasese town) and Juba (with a branch line to Pakwach town) to the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) border and again from Mpodwe to the DRC border.

 

China Communication Company is undertaking construction of the part of the Standard Gauge Railway in Kenya, in a project that will see 40 percent of work sub-contracted to local companies.

 

China Railway No.2 Engineering Group Co. Ltd Tanzania

Tanzania has awarded contracts to build new railway lines worth about $9 billion to Chinese firms, its transport minister said, expanding Beijing's presence in East Africa's second-biggest economy. Transport Minister Samuel Sitta told parliament that a Chinese consortium had been awarded a contract to build a 2,561 km (1,536 miles) standard gauge railway connecting Dar es Salaam port to land-locked neighbours at a cost of $7.6 billion.

"A consortium of Chinese railway companies led by China Railway Materials (CRM) has been picked to help us build the railway line," he said. The consortium will provide 10 percent of the funding for the project while financial adviser Rothschild is finalising procedures for financing of the project through banks, Sitta said. The minister said construction of the railway line was expected to start in June.

He said Tanzania had signed a framework agreement with another Chinese company, China Railway No.2 Engineering Group Co. Ltd., to build a railway line linking coal and iron ore mine projects, also under development by a Chinese group, to the southern port of Mtwara near big offshore natural gas discoveries.

The 1,000 km standard gauge railway line is expected to cost at least $1.4 billion, according to the Tanzanian government estimates. Tanzania said in March it planned to spend $14.2 billion to construct a new rail network in the next five years financed with commercial loans, as the country aims to become a regional transport hub.

Tanzania, like its neighbour Kenya, wants to profit from its long coastline and upgrade existing railways and roads to serve growing economies in the land-locked heart of Africa.

Oil discoveries in Kenya and Uganda and gas finds in Tanzania have turned East Africa into an exploration hotspot for oil firms but transport infrastructure in those countries has suffered from decades of under-investment.

Tanzania last year signed an agreement with China Merchant Holding International (CMHI) to build a new mega port and economic zone at Bagamoyo expected to cost at least $10 billion. China is also financing a $1.2 billion, 532 km (330 mile) natural gas pipeline in Tanzania.

Molinari Rail Ethiopia

Ethiopia is engaging in a highly ambitious railway construction programme as the government attempts to lay the foundations for economic growth. Chinese finance is supporting the majority of the schemes but as Michele Molinari and Noah Gunzinger of Swiss consultancy firm Molinari Rail, reveal, the Weldiya - Awash project is taking a different approach.

 

Ethiopia, the cradle of humankind, has shown vast progress in recent years. Besides stunning population growth to become the second largest country in Africa with over 90 million inhabitants, it is also experiencing strong economic development. Large multinational companies, attracted by its relative proximity to Europe and the Middle East, have begun exploring the country as a basis for manufacturing textiles and machinery. However, transport costs are high and remain a barrier to investment.

 

In response, the Ethiopian government launched a five-year Growth and Transformation Plan (GTP) in 2010 of which the National Railway Network of Ethiopia (NRNE) is a major element. The plan aims to gradually transform the land-locked country into an interconnected economy with efficient high capacity transport links to adjacent countries and ports.

 

Ethiopia's Council of Ministers established Ethiopian Railway Corporation (ERC) on November 28 2007 with a mandate to develop an integrated and high-capacity railway providing competitive and affordable passenger and freight transport services. By providing the gateway to overseas markets, Djibouti's ports are of high importance in Ethiopia's transport master plan. While implementation of the plan has not exactly gone to schedule, some railway construction programmes are now up and running and ERC is on the verge of introducing a regular service. Eight corridors are under development in two phases, with phase 1 already underway while phase 2 encompasses expansion projects.

 

InfraCo Africa Kenya

InfraCo Africa is working with Kenya Railways to develop the Nairobi Commuter Rail Project.  The Project will involve the rehabilitation of approximately 65km of the existing rail system within Nairobi, the construction of 5-7 km of new track to the Jomo Kenyatta International Airport (JKIA), and the rehabilitation or construction of stations and other facilities along the network.  The Project will expand social and economic opportunities for all residents, introducing modern efficient equipment and reducing congestion in and around Nairobi.

 

The total project implementation cost is expected to be US$325m, comprising US$180m for capital infrastructure and US$145m for operating assets. It will use the existing rail rights-of-way, land and stations within Nairobi and introduce new purpose-built rolling stock (coaches). It will also involve a new signalling system, rehabilitation of 4 existing stations and approximately 160km of the existing rail system within Nairobi and construction of around 5-7km of new rail tracks to the Jomo Kenyatta International Airport (JKIA) and 13 new stations. The project will expand social and economic opportunities for all residents, introducing modern, efficient equipment and reducing congestion in and around Nairobi. Currently, commuters who take the train to work are jammed inside old and run-down carriages, while others hang precariously from car doors. Most Kenyans living in the capital city use minibuses, which are often badly driven and poorly maintained.

 

A dedicated rail line for passenger trains between Nairobi and JKIA will come as a relief to travellers and relieve pressure on the road to the airport, itself an important part of the regional road network. The current rail system serves 19,000 passengers per day, and is estimated to serve around 10% of the total population of Nairobi. Once the commuter rail project is completed it is expected to carry up to 100,000 passengers per day – travelling between JKIA and Nairobi’s central business district could take as little as 17 minutes at frequencies as high as every 30 minutes. Also set to ease is travelling between Nairobi and Thika, Nakuru, Athi River and towns in between that are currently served by the railway line.

 

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